Category: Food & Drink

Mitarashi Dango: A Kyoto Classic

Mitarashi dango (みたらし団子), the traditional Japanese skewered dessert similar to mochi, has become a popular treat enjoyed across the globe. Consisting of three to five

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How to Make Strawberry Daifuku at Home

Strawberry daifuku, also called strawberry mochi, or ichigo daifuku, are a traditional Japanese delicacy with tangy strawberries. The slight acidity of Japanese strawberries is a perfect match for the sticky-sweet mochi and anko.

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Japanese Ceramics—The Art of Shape and Color

When enjoying Japanese cuisine one of the things that will catch your eye is how well presented food is set before you. The tray becomes a garden, curated by a master who carefully placed food on tastefully chosen ceramic pieces of different colors, shapes and sizes.

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The story of Hojicha: One of Japan’s Most Popular Drinks

It’s crazy how popular tea is in Japan. You can find all sorts of bottled teas being sold in convenience stores or vending machines across the country, and in some restaurants, they even offer hot tea as a free beverage because many Japanese people like to have tea while they’re enjoying their meals.

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These Healthy Japanese Snacks Are Packed Full of Flavor

Kit Kats, Pocky, umaibo—many of Japan’s most popular snacks might give the more health-conscious among us pause. But despite the country’s well established enthusiasm for colorful, super-salty, and sugary treats, there are just as many healthy Japanese snacks as there are indulgent ones.

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A plate of Japanese sponge cake, castella

Discover Castella, A Japanese Sponge Cake With a Delicious History

When you think of Japan and wagashi, the first images that spring to mind are mochi and all things anko. But there is a wagashi staple that can be confusing for most—Nagasaki’s Castella. It looks like your typical sponge cake, simple but delectable. It is great with black tea or coffee for a sweet snack at home. So how did Castella become a Japanese cake?

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